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About

The mooc.utas.edu.au website enables access to the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) developed by the University of Tasmania, including the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre.

Queries

If you have questions regarding the Understanding Dementia MOOC, contact us here.
If you have questions regarding the Preventing Dementia MOOC, contact us here.

The University of Tasmania was established in 1890 and is Australia’s fourth oldest university. The University offers more than 110 undergraduate degrees across traditional and specialised disciplines, as well as a generous scholarship program.

The University of Tasmania has three world-class Institutes: the Australian Maritime College (AMC), Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Menzies Institute for Medical Research. With over 27,000 students, the University has campuses in Hobart, Launceston and Burnie, as well as two Sydney campuses for programs in Nursing and Paramedic Practice.

Visit www.utas.edu.au for further information.

The Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre is part of the University of Tasmania's Faculty of Health. Established in 2008, the Centre undertakes a range of dementia research projects and offers a variety of dementia education programs. The educational and research programs are closely interlinked, with research outcomes; a critical element of the Centre's teaching. One education offering is the free, online Understanding Dementia MOOC.

Dementia is a major health issue affecting a growing number of people worldwide. Its impact on individuals, €communities, and society is profound. Alzheimer's Disease International predicts that, from 2010 to 2050, the total number of people with dementia requiring care will almost treble from 44 to 135 million worldwide.

© University of Tasmania, Australia.

ABN 30 764 374 782. CRICOS Provider Code 00586B